FARE MADE INTERVIEW

What is Fare Made?

Fare Made stands for fabricated realities. All of us are architects, which is where we were first exposed to maker culture, DIY, digital tools and design. Our business involves helping a lot of creative people get their designs off the ground, mainly through our laser cutting machine.

What inspired you to open Fare Made?

We were very inspired by Bauhaus. The idea is that there were different skills that revolved around architecture. It was an institution. Under the umbrella of architecture, design, planning, art, even things like theatre. This collaborative spirit existed - and this is why we do what we do. So many great architects from Bauhaus were designing pieces of furniture and other kinds of products. For us, the design world is inter-connected.

What are some of the typical products you make?

We make functional prototypes, architectural models, and other goods. We offer architectural services ranging from house renovations to small businesses/spaces. We're redesigning a warehouse and storefront right now. We also have another company called Mode, which is our fashion brand. 

What do you like about manufacturing in Toronto?

We definitely think that it's important to empower the local economy. The benefit is that we get to work with people who produce locally as well - we're developing our own network. For example, the felt company that we buy from is from Toronto, it's made here. We don't see a downside - it's great to have accessibility, you have more interaction with designers, especially with our design concepts. 

Have you encountered any barriers to the manufacturing you do in the city?

We use an expensive filter for our machine that allows for a lot of flexibility. Eventually, though, we'd like to have a larger space. We looked into grants when we started out but didn't find anything that applied to us.

Do you if small manufacturers are looking to scale up, they could tap into existing manufacturers?

I think it's already happening, especially with medium-scale manufacturing, though sometimes they operate on different networks. That's why it's essential for makers to have a network of 3D printing, laser printing, Computerized Numerical Control (CNC). It's part of the same category.

You can check out FareMade's website here